Taking and rooting tree cuttings

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation and Breeding' started by hoodoowytch, Apr 19, 2015.

  1. hoodoowytch

    hoodoowytch Anthocerotophyta

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    I want to take some cuttings from some wild red plum trees I found growing fairly close by and have me my own yummy plums growing close to hand. (Wanna try my hand at some homemade plum wine!) My query is how do I get the tree cuttings to root? And when should I take them? Before or after they fruit for the season?

    I have some rooting hormone powder for plant cuttings....will that work with tree cuttings?
     
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  2. charlottejoan

    charlottejoan Charophyta

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    Oh, what fond memories I have of the plum tree I planted, as a child! Here is my idea of what we did, we found a plum that had fallen and planted it.

    Now, you could take a cutting, but my opinion very tricky. Not sure when to do it. Better to watch out for little seedlings to pop up.

    I even replanted it two times and it thrived! When I go back home, I think I will go back to one of our old farm houses and take a peek at it.
     
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  3. hoodoowytch

    hoodoowytch Anthocerotophyta

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    The reason I want to take a cutting is because I want a mature enough tree cutting to get fruit from it while I am still walking and breathing. :p
    I've bought them like that...actually with blossoms and fruit growing on them at time of purchase and even when we put it into the ground it did fine and I got the plums for that season, about 10 of them I believe, and next season got even more. It looked like a branch that had been pruned and rooted too. Unfortunately, that tree was planted down in Ga. and I now live in Ky.


    I've no problem with planting a seed, or lots of seeds...but I have no idea how long it takes for a plum tree to grow mature enough to get fruit from it.:)
     
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  4. charlottejoan

    charlottejoan Charophyta

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    Oh, right! You want some plums sooner rather than later! To tell you the truth, I have not idea how long it took my tree to produce plums. I just loved to look at those dark leaves on the tree. You know, what I mean? Plum trees are just so different from so many other variety of fruit trees! Besides, I was always at my grandmothers house eating the plums off from the mother tree (where my plum seed originated)! Maybe someone can fill us in on the exact difference between planting a plum seed and planting a cutting? I bet my mom remembers....

    Have you ever planted a fruit tree from a seed or cutting?
     
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  5. Kloned

    Kloned Chlorophyta

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    Hey,

    The trick is making sure you give your cuttings the right environment, and usually, you want to take cuttings from the softer, new growth. Since it is spring, that shouldn't be an issue. My Peach and Apple trees have plenty of new growth. You can visit my site and check out some various options. I don't know if I should post a link here, but, thecloningstore dot com is the site.

    If you find something there and have questions, you can ask me. You are right... the clone will be the same age and have the 'memories' of the plant and will grow faster and stronger... if it is done correctly.
     
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  6. hoodoowytch

    hoodoowytch Anthocerotophyta

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    Thank you very much Kloned! I will check out your site and I really do want to have a whole bunch of fruit trees like this. It takes so long to grow them from seeds...and while I'm not uber-old with one foot in a hole and the other one sliding on a banana peel, I am in my mid-40s and don't think waiting for one to mature in 15 or 20 years would be conducive to getting the fruit I am after. LOL
     
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  7. hoodoowytch

    hoodoowytch Anthocerotophyta

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    Well, I've tried and not had a lot of luck with it. Although, I must admit a lot of my seeds have come from store bought fruits and they just seem to have something all buggered up with them. Some germinate, but then they go all weird and die. Others just don't do anything. I would DEARLY love an apple tree, plum tree, pear tree, black cherry tree and some nut trees...damn...we really need a much bigger piece of land. LOL
     
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  8. Kloned

    Kloned Chlorophyta

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    No problem. We are about the same age and I know what you mean about waiting for a seed to grow. :) I've tried growing from acorns before and that is a long process. It can be done and may be fun to watch, but, if you have a purpose/end goal of making a product, then.... no.
     
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  9. hoodoowytch

    hoodoowytch Anthocerotophyta

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    If we was 20-something it might be a different story...but me hubby is 60 and I am 46...and I doubt either of us has another 50 years to work with. LOL

    But, getting several cuttings from already mature trees works just peachy. :)
     
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