Soil types

Discussion in 'Fertilizer, Soil and Planting Medium' started by bellahpereira, Nov 3, 2014.

  1. bellahpereira

    bellahpereira Chlorophyta

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    Planting can be complicated when you start to consider all the different factors. I never had an issue with growing anything until I moved into my current house. I never realized that soil type can be so very important. My current soil is very clay-like, it's not too bad but once it hardens, it hardens for real :p I didn't think it would be that big an issue until I started to plan my garden this year. I started to check 'soil types' when looking up seeds because I wanted to make sure that I could grow everything I wanted. I quickly realized that I wasn't going to be able to do much with this land. I had to grow my carrots in a pot because the soil was too hard for them to push through, I had to grow my cayenne peppers in a pot because I was concerned that the soil type wasn't going to let them grow. This was quite a hassle. I'm considering buying a big amount of dirt and mixing it into my bad dirt so that I don't have this issue again next year.

    Has anyone else tried to supplement/mix their soil with another type in an attempt to help their crops? What type of soil do you have and does it impede your ability to grow things? Or, are you one of those people who think soil type doesn't/shouldn't matter?
     
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  2. John S

    John S Administrator
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    New houses tend to contain hard pan since the top soil is scraped off and the sub-soil is on top instead. Once heavy equipment runs on top of it, it's like cement! Never mix actually top soil into existing soil. With the right size sand particles, the clay mixture can make the soil worse. Only use pure organic material and mix in material more resistant to decay like pine bark.

    However, it is a good idea to just top on about 8-10 inches of top soil on top of the existing soil as a more low cost and simple approach. Just remember to buy a truck load because there is no way you will be doing this with bags from you local hardware store!
     
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