'Scientists resuscitate flora frozen since 1600s'.

Discussion in 'Arctic Plants' started by togata57, May 30, 2013.

  1. togata57

    togata57 Lycopodiophyta

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,175
    Likes Received:
    521
  2. John S

    John S Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,277
    Likes Received:
    270
    I read this earlier in the week. I wonder how warm it was when they were uncovered.
     
    #2
  3. MercyL

    MercyL Chlorophyta

    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    5
    This begs the question," what happens when the icecaps are gone and all those old plant spores decide to start growing, again"?

    Some ancient plants might displace our modern plants or cross pollinate with existing plant species, making food crops dangerous to eat and/or poisoning animals who eat a plant that looks normal but carries hidden, ancient toxins for protection.

    The results might not be that bad, though. I can almost hear Monsanto licking its chops.

    There maybe genes that, when spliced into existing food crops, make them hardier, lower their watering requirements, or change annuals into perennials.
     
    #3
  4. John S

    John S Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,277
    Likes Received:
    270
    I doubt anything that's frozen is that old to make any difference.
     
    #4
  5. firelily99

    firelily99 Marchantiophyta

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2014
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    6
    I think I may have eaten a few things out of the freezer that were frozen that long. Seriously that is an amazing thing that they did. Instead of trying to grow the frozen sample I would think that they would take some DNA and try and clone it.
     
    #5

Share This Page